Call for Papers: Shakespeare Recreated, New Contexts, New Interpretations

Soon, we will start profiling our fabulous plenary speakers. Until then, check out this upcoming student conference hosted by the Shakespeare International Studies Centre with the Geoffrey Chaucer Student Society and CULTUR(N)ED Student Society:

SHAKESPEARE RECREATED: NEW CONTEXTS, NEW INTERPRETATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF ŁÓDŹ, 22-23 APRIL 2015

Although the Bard appears to be the most researched author in the world, his works and his own person still inspire, puzzle and encourage heated debates. Our conference marks a special three-year period in the history of the appreciation of Shakespeare, with the 450th anniversary of his birth in 2014 and the 400th anniversary of his death in 2016. We would like to invite proposals for 20 minute presentations (followed up by approximately 10 minutes of discussion) in all areas of studies connected with the works of William Shakespeare. Suggested topics include but are not restricted to:

  • Shakespeare and popculture: comics, computer games, youtube, parodies, etc.;
  • Filming Shakespeare: Shakespeare on film and television, adaptations and appropriations,
    representations of the playwright on screen;
  • Performing Shakespeare: staging Shakespeare then and now;
  • Polish explorations of Shakespeare: Shakespeare’s presence in Polish literature, film,
    theatre and art;
  • Representations of (and inspirations by) Shakespeare’s works in world literature, film,
    theatre and art;
  • Reviving Shakespeare: methods of popularizing Shakespeare in Britain and other countries;
  • Movements and disruptions within the Shakespearean canon: why some of his works are
    more popular in certain moments in history or even gain a lasting popularity, while others
    are neglected?
  • Elizabethan culture—society, economy, fashion—and the works of Shakespeare;
  • Apocryphal Shakespeare: plays attributed to Shakespeare, collaborative works and lost
    plays;
  • Intertextual Shakespeare: Shakespearean references in modern works;
  • Shakespeare in the light of modern theories: Ecocriticism, Poststructuralism, Postcolonialism, New Historicism, Gender & Queer Theory, etc.

The conference will be held at the Faculty of International and Political Studies, University of Łódź, on 22-23 April 2015.

The following distinguished guests have confirmed their participation:

– prof. Virginia Mason Vaughan (University in Worcester, Massachusetts);
– prof. Alden T. Vaughan (University in Worcester, Massachusetts);
– dr Dmytro Drozdovsky (National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine).

We invite all undergraduate, graduate and doctoral students to participate. The conference will be held both in English and Polish. Abstracts of ca. 250 words should be submitted to shakespeare.recreated@gmail.com no later than 29 March 2015. Selected papers will be published. The registration fee is 30 PLN (10 EURO for overseas participants), which covers coffee breaks, conference materials and publication.

For more information, please contact the secretaries of the conference at shakespeare.recreated@gmail.com. To find out more about us, please visit the official conference website (http://shakespearerecreated.tumblr.com/) and the website of Shakespeare International Studies Centre (http://shakespearecentre.uni.lodz.pl).

Download this call for papers here.

Call for Papers: Heroes and Heroines

Do you consider yourself a hero? Well, it doesn’t matter as long as you can write about them. Shakespeare Jahrbuch, the Yearbook of the German Shakespeare Society, is calling for papers on Heroes and Heroines. Send them your work by March 31.

The 2016 volume of Shakespeare Jahrbuch will be a special issue devoted to “Heroes and Heroines”.
The editorial board of Shakespeare Jahrbuch invites essays on the following topics:

  • Shakespeare as a cultural/national hero
  • Heroes and heroines in Shakespeare’s plays
  • Heroism in Shakespeare’s plays
  • Shakespearean anti-heroes
  • Tragic and comic heroes/heroines
  • Heroism and genre
  • Shakespeare and the heroes of early modern England
  • Shakespeare and (early modern, Romantic, Victorian, modern …) hero-worship
  • Actors and actresses as heroes/heroines
  • Heroes /heroines in Shakespeare adaptations

Papers to be published in the Shakespeare Jahrbuch should be formatted according to our style sheet.
Please send your manuscripts (of not more than 6,000 words) to the editor of the Shakespeare Jahrbuch, Prof. Dr. Sabine Schülting (email: sabine.schuelting(at)fu-berlin.de), by 31 March 2015.

(Link to call for papers.)

Call for Papers: Over His Dead Body

Bring out your dead! On March 27, the University of York will celebrate Richard III’s reinternment with a workshop on… corpses. Submit your proposals for Over His Dead Body by January 5:

The legal battle between Leicester and York over the remains of Richard III
came to an end in May 2014 with a High Court ruling that the last
Plantagenet king is to be buried in Leicester Cathedral. This hard-fought,
sometimes acrimonious, dispute over bones found in a municipal car park
presented a fascinating spectacle; a modern, even postmodern, restaging of
the medieval myth of the king’s two bodies. The King is dead; long live
the King.

In this research workshop, York and Leicester put their differences aside –
or rather, bring them together in memory and celebration of the historical
figure who inspired one of Shakespeare’s most popular incarnations. To mark
the occasion of Richard’s reinterment on March 26, 2015, the Department of
English and Related Literature at York and the School of Modern Languages
at Leicester invite proposals for a research workshop that will explore the
significance of the Shakespearian dead body on page, stage and screen.
Participants will be invited to join the audience at a memorial lecture in
York Minster on March 26, followed by the research workshop at Kings Manor
– a seat of Tudor government in northern England – on Friday March 27.

Perhaps even more so than the ghost, the Shakespearian dead body raises
fundamental questions about space, place, and belonging and about the
powers that shape its medial and intermedial exhumations and reinterments.
We invite proposals for 15-minute presentations offering textual readings of
Shakespearian bodies, including but not only Richard, either in the
Shakespearian text, or in modern or contemporary production and
performance. Topics might include the following:

· ‘The body is with the king, but the king is not with the body’:
where do we find, or look for, the Shakespearian dead body?
·‘Look on her. Look, her lips’: the Shakespearian dead body as
‘sight’ or image; its embodiment in or by performance, and/or in other
cultures.
·‘O gentlemen, see, see! Dead Henry’s wounds Ope their congealed
mouths and bleed afresh!’ What is at stake in the physical confrontation
of the dead with the living?
· What does the Shakespearian dead body lose, or gain, in translation or
remediation?
·How have particular productions or performances used the Shakespearian
dead body to ask questions about the ‘world’ outside the play?
·What motivates contemporary artists, directors, translators and academics
to contribute to these re-incarnations?
·How is the Shakespearian dead body given value in non-cultural
institutions (the State, science, the press)?

Inter- or multi-disciplinary perspectives are welcome. Proposals featuring
abstracts of up to 250 words in English and a short biographical
description should be sent in word format (doc. or .docx) to both
organizers by January 5 2015.
Please put ‘Over His Dead Body proposal’ in the subject line of your
e-mail.

Nicole Fayard, University of Leicester: nicole.fayard@le.ac.uk
Erica Sheen, University of York: erica.sheen@york.ac.uk

Location: King’s Manor, University of York

(Link to call for papers.)

Upcoming Conferences: Shakespeare & Friendship

Greetings! While you’re eagerly awaiting BritGrad 2015, we will periodically alert you to relevant conferences and calls for papers. Let’s begin with The Halved Heart: Shakespeare & Friendship (with the looming submissions deadline of December 12):

For men and women in Shakespeare’s England, friendship was a relation that
spanned the exquisite virtue of amicitia perfecta and the everyday exchanges
of neighbourliness and commerce. A friend might be ‘another self’, but it was
essential to be wary of false friends or flatterers. The complex nature of early
modern friendship was a rich source of inspiration for early modern dramatists.

Globe Education at Shakespeare’s Globe is pleased to announce our spring
conference, The Halved Heart: Shakespeare and Friendship (Friday 17
– Sunday 19 April 2015), and we invite proposals for papers and panels.
Speakers may address the Renaissance fascination with the ethical demands
of idealised friendship, or the pragmatic reality of instrumental alliances,
as explored on stage. Papers might consider the theatre as a site of social
promiscuity, where spectators could be instructed in the arts (and hazards) of
friendship even as such relationships were enacted in the auditorium. Or they
might examine the overlap between friendship and eroticism, and the points of
conflict between friendship and other forms of social alliance such as marriage,
or the relationship between monarch and subject.

The conference will conclude on Sunday 19 April with a staged reading by a
company of Globe actors of The Faithful Friends (Anon., King’s Men, c.1614).

Proposals of no more than 300 words for papers (or panels of up to three
papers) may be submitted to Dr Will Tosh on will.t@shakespearesglobe.com.
The deadline for submissions is Friday 12 December 2014.

The conference is for scholars and students but is open to all members of the
public who are interested in debates about early modern theatre and friendship.

(Linke to call for papers.)

When bookings open, visit the Globe’s website to purchase tickets. Who doesn’t want to learn about friendship? Just don’t go down the dark route taken by Valentine and Proteus in The Two Gentlemen of Verona.

2 conferences, 1 journal, 3 August deadlines

1. ‘Shakespearean Journeys’, Asian Shakespeare Association, 15-17 May 2014

Download the CFP for the inaugural conference of the ASA

Deadline 15 August 2013

2. ‘Shakespeare and his Contemporaries’, The British Institute of Florence, 10 April 2014

Download the 6th Annual Postgraduate Conference CFP

Deadline 30 October 2013

3. Shakespeare Institute Review

Issue 2  now available

CFP announced for Issue 3: ‘Love and Lust in Shakespeare’, submission deadline 31 August

CFP: ‘Playing Games’ a Graduate Conference at UCL

‘Playing Games’ – Department of English Language and Literature, University College London Graduate Conference – 24 May 2013

Play, writes Roger Caillois (Man, Play and Games, 1961), is an activity that is free and non-productive, unfolds in a circumscribed time and place with an uncertain conclusion, is rule-governed and ‘accompanied by a special awareness of a second reality’….
This conference will explore diverse expressions of game/play in literature, film, the visual arts, performance, architecture and design. It is concerned with games that serve as allegories, as narrative devices or as structuring metaphors; from playful conceits through to the esoterica of avant-garde experimentation.

We invite proposals for 20 minute papers from students at MA and PhD level, both from literature departments and across other disciplines. Extracts from work in progress are welcome.

Submissions might consider game/play as…

…a confrontation with chance and uncertainty 
…a questioning of identity
…a sublimation of conflict 
…an envisaging of ulterior space
…a reaction against utility
…a challenge to systemisation
…an engagement with structure and restraint 

The following list of fluid, non-restrictive categories, exemplary practitioners and works demonstrates the range of approaches and topics that applicants might like to consider…

Game/play as content

– Thomas Middleton’s A Game of Chess
– Fyodor Dostoevsky’s The Gambler
– Michael Haneke’s Funny Games
– Raymond Chandler’s The High Window

Game/play as form

– Laurence Sterne’ s Tristram Shandy
– Raymond Queneau’s Exercises in Style
– Mark Z. Danielewski’s House of Leaves
– Philip Sydney’s Lady of May

Game/play as practice

– Unconventional, non-linear and emergent videogame narratives – Christine Love, Fumito Ueda, thatgamecompany 
– Immersive, confrontational and experimental theatre practitioners – Punchdrunk, Forced Entertainment, The Factory 
– Improvisatory, collaborative and performance-based art – Marina Abramović, Spartacus Chetwynd, Jeremy Deller

Please send abstracts of 250-300 words, along with a very brief biographical statement, to PlayingGamesUCL@gmail.com

Deadline for submissions: midday, Friday 26 April 2013.

You can download the pdf here: Playing_Games_UCL_CFP.

CFP: Reanimating Playbooks symposium

It’s shaping up to be a busy spring in Stratford! 

A month before our conference convenes, the Shakespeare Institute will host a one day symposium on editing, Renaissance plays, and performance. Check out the CFP below – the deadline is two weeks today. Info on registration for auditors will be released in just a few weeks, so consider coming for the day even if you don’t wish to present. (We have it on good authority that the symposium convenors expect a day of lively discussion and editorial experimentation.)

 

Reanimating Playbooks:

Editing for Performance, Performance for Editing.

Symposium: Friday 10 May 2013, Shakespeare Institute, Stratford-upon-Avon

A one-day symposium to engage in the conversation between performance and text. We wish to provide a space to explore editorial practices on both sides of publication (from preparation to practice) and to explore how we use, compose, and conceptualise critical editions of Renaissance plays. The day will include a plenary panel of editors and theatre practitioners and two practical workshops.

Speakers are invited to submit proposals for 10 minute ‘provocations’ in which a question may be posed, a sticky editorial decision worked through, a long-standing practice interrogated, a new methodology explored, or something else entirely queried, crowd-sourced, considered, contested or created. Suggested topics include but are not limited to:       

–       new solutions to old editorial cruxes

–       problems or triumphs in your own editorial projects

–       experiments with stage directions, punctuation, formatting, annotations

–       desired aims of individual editions, or proposals for a new series style

–       directors/dramaturgs as editors, and vice versa

–       favorite editors of days past

–       the pedagogy of critical editions

We also welcome proposals for 15-20 minute papers or workshops.

A limited number of volunteer actors may be available for workshops; anticipated requests ideally would be included in your proposal.

Please submit 150-word abstracts, along with brief biographical statement to C K Ash at cxa052@bham.ac.uk by Friday 15 March. Accepted proposals will be notified 22 March. Please do not hesitate to e-mail her with any questions about the event.

You can download the pdf here: CFP Reanimating Playbooks

Ooopsie!

 Friends, we’d like to admit our own folly. Whereas we previously advertised the closing date for presenters as Friday 25th April and auditors as Friday 23rd May, and the conference as ‘The British Shakespeare Graduate Conference’, these were incorrect. We’d like to reassure you all that the closing dates for both are Thursday 25th April (presenters) and Thursday 23rd May (auditors), not Friday – and for those of you mailing cheques and bank orders, please address them to ‘The British Graduate Conference’ [even though the official name of the conference is ‘The British Graduate Shakespeare Conference’]. We apologise for these errors, and have promptly rectified them.

(See, even BritGrad makes mistakes…)

 
And just so everything is crystal clear, here’s the CFP again:

Registration is open!

Friends, postgrads, countrymen…lend us your abstracts!
 
We come to open BritGrad registration.
 
The research that men do lives after them,
 
The best is often entered in their papers,
 
So let it be with BritGrad.
 
 
(What are you waiting for? Get registering now! See the CFP and poster for more details.)