Call for Papers: Shakespeare Recreated, New Contexts, New Interpretations

Soon, we will start profiling our fabulous plenary speakers. Until then, check out this upcoming student conference hosted by the Shakespeare International Studies Centre with the Geoffrey Chaucer Student Society and CULTUR(N)ED Student Society:

SHAKESPEARE RECREATED: NEW CONTEXTS, NEW INTERPRETATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF ŁÓDŹ, 22-23 APRIL 2015

Although the Bard appears to be the most researched author in the world, his works and his own person still inspire, puzzle and encourage heated debates. Our conference marks a special three-year period in the history of the appreciation of Shakespeare, with the 450th anniversary of his birth in 2014 and the 400th anniversary of his death in 2016. We would like to invite proposals for 20 minute presentations (followed up by approximately 10 minutes of discussion) in all areas of studies connected with the works of William Shakespeare. Suggested topics include but are not restricted to:

  • Shakespeare and popculture: comics, computer games, youtube, parodies, etc.;
  • Filming Shakespeare: Shakespeare on film and television, adaptations and appropriations,
    representations of the playwright on screen;
  • Performing Shakespeare: staging Shakespeare then and now;
  • Polish explorations of Shakespeare: Shakespeare’s presence in Polish literature, film,
    theatre and art;
  • Representations of (and inspirations by) Shakespeare’s works in world literature, film,
    theatre and art;
  • Reviving Shakespeare: methods of popularizing Shakespeare in Britain and other countries;
  • Movements and disruptions within the Shakespearean canon: why some of his works are
    more popular in certain moments in history or even gain a lasting popularity, while others
    are neglected?
  • Elizabethan culture—society, economy, fashion—and the works of Shakespeare;
  • Apocryphal Shakespeare: plays attributed to Shakespeare, collaborative works and lost
    plays;
  • Intertextual Shakespeare: Shakespearean references in modern works;
  • Shakespeare in the light of modern theories: Ecocriticism, Poststructuralism, Postcolonialism, New Historicism, Gender & Queer Theory, etc.

The conference will be held at the Faculty of International and Political Studies, University of Łódź, on 22-23 April 2015.

The following distinguished guests have confirmed their participation:

– prof. Virginia Mason Vaughan (University in Worcester, Massachusetts);
– prof. Alden T. Vaughan (University in Worcester, Massachusetts);
– dr Dmytro Drozdovsky (National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine).

We invite all undergraduate, graduate and doctoral students to participate. The conference will be held both in English and Polish. Abstracts of ca. 250 words should be submitted to shakespeare.recreated@gmail.com no later than 29 March 2015. Selected papers will be published. The registration fee is 30 PLN (10 EURO for overseas participants), which covers coffee breaks, conference materials and publication.

For more information, please contact the secretaries of the conference at shakespeare.recreated@gmail.com. To find out more about us, please visit the official conference website (http://shakespearerecreated.tumblr.com/) and the website of Shakespeare International Studies Centre (http://shakespearecentre.uni.lodz.pl).

Download this call for papers here.

Call for Papers: Over His Dead Body

Bring out your dead! On March 27, the University of York will celebrate Richard III’s reinternment with a workshop on… corpses. Submit your proposals for Over His Dead Body by January 5:

The legal battle between Leicester and York over the remains of Richard III
came to an end in May 2014 with a High Court ruling that the last
Plantagenet king is to be buried in Leicester Cathedral. This hard-fought,
sometimes acrimonious, dispute over bones found in a municipal car park
presented a fascinating spectacle; a modern, even postmodern, restaging of
the medieval myth of the king’s two bodies. The King is dead; long live
the King.

In this research workshop, York and Leicester put their differences aside –
or rather, bring them together in memory and celebration of the historical
figure who inspired one of Shakespeare’s most popular incarnations. To mark
the occasion of Richard’s reinterment on March 26, 2015, the Department of
English and Related Literature at York and the School of Modern Languages
at Leicester invite proposals for a research workshop that will explore the
significance of the Shakespearian dead body on page, stage and screen.
Participants will be invited to join the audience at a memorial lecture in
York Minster on March 26, followed by the research workshop at Kings Manor
– a seat of Tudor government in northern England – on Friday March 27.

Perhaps even more so than the ghost, the Shakespearian dead body raises
fundamental questions about space, place, and belonging and about the
powers that shape its medial and intermedial exhumations and reinterments.
We invite proposals for 15-minute presentations offering textual readings of
Shakespearian bodies, including but not only Richard, either in the
Shakespearian text, or in modern or contemporary production and
performance. Topics might include the following:

· ‘The body is with the king, but the king is not with the body’:
where do we find, or look for, the Shakespearian dead body?
·‘Look on her. Look, her lips’: the Shakespearian dead body as
‘sight’ or image; its embodiment in or by performance, and/or in other
cultures.
·‘O gentlemen, see, see! Dead Henry’s wounds Ope their congealed
mouths and bleed afresh!’ What is at stake in the physical confrontation
of the dead with the living?
· What does the Shakespearian dead body lose, or gain, in translation or
remediation?
·How have particular productions or performances used the Shakespearian
dead body to ask questions about the ‘world’ outside the play?
·What motivates contemporary artists, directors, translators and academics
to contribute to these re-incarnations?
·How is the Shakespearian dead body given value in non-cultural
institutions (the State, science, the press)?

Inter- or multi-disciplinary perspectives are welcome. Proposals featuring
abstracts of up to 250 words in English and a short biographical
description should be sent in word format (doc. or .docx) to both
organizers by January 5 2015.
Please put ‘Over His Dead Body proposal’ in the subject line of your
e-mail.

Nicole Fayard, University of Leicester: nicole.fayard@le.ac.uk
Erica Sheen, University of York: erica.sheen@york.ac.uk

Location: King’s Manor, University of York

(Link to call for papers.)

Upcoming Conferences: Shakespeare & Friendship

Greetings! While you’re eagerly awaiting BritGrad 2015, we will periodically alert you to relevant conferences and calls for papers. Let’s begin with The Halved Heart: Shakespeare & Friendship (with the looming submissions deadline of December 12):

For men and women in Shakespeare’s England, friendship was a relation that
spanned the exquisite virtue of amicitia perfecta and the everyday exchanges
of neighbourliness and commerce. A friend might be ‘another self’, but it was
essential to be wary of false friends or flatterers. The complex nature of early
modern friendship was a rich source of inspiration for early modern dramatists.

Globe Education at Shakespeare’s Globe is pleased to announce our spring
conference, The Halved Heart: Shakespeare and Friendship (Friday 17
– Sunday 19 April 2015), and we invite proposals for papers and panels.
Speakers may address the Renaissance fascination with the ethical demands
of idealised friendship, or the pragmatic reality of instrumental alliances,
as explored on stage. Papers might consider the theatre as a site of social
promiscuity, where spectators could be instructed in the arts (and hazards) of
friendship even as such relationships were enacted in the auditorium. Or they
might examine the overlap between friendship and eroticism, and the points of
conflict between friendship and other forms of social alliance such as marriage,
or the relationship between monarch and subject.

The conference will conclude on Sunday 19 April with a staged reading by a
company of Globe actors of The Faithful Friends (Anon., King’s Men, c.1614).

Proposals of no more than 300 words for papers (or panels of up to three
papers) may be submitted to Dr Will Tosh on will.t@shakespearesglobe.com.
The deadline for submissions is Friday 12 December 2014.

The conference is for scholars and students but is open to all members of the
public who are interested in debates about early modern theatre and friendship.

(Linke to call for papers.)

When bookings open, visit the Globe’s website to purchase tickets. Who doesn’t want to learn about friendship? Just don’t go down the dark route taken by Valentine and Proteus in The Two Gentlemen of Verona.

2 conferences, 1 journal, 3 August deadlines

1. ‘Shakespearean Journeys’, Asian Shakespeare Association, 15-17 May 2014

Download the CFP for the inaugural conference of the ASA

Deadline 15 August 2013

2. ‘Shakespeare and his Contemporaries’, The British Institute of Florence, 10 April 2014

Download the 6th Annual Postgraduate Conference CFP

Deadline 30 October 2013

3. Shakespeare Institute Review

Issue 2  now available

CFP announced for Issue 3: ‘Love and Lust in Shakespeare’, submission deadline 31 August

CFP: Reanimating Playbooks symposium

It’s shaping up to be a busy spring in Stratford! 

A month before our conference convenes, the Shakespeare Institute will host a one day symposium on editing, Renaissance plays, and performance. Check out the CFP below – the deadline is two weeks today. Info on registration for auditors will be released in just a few weeks, so consider coming for the day even if you don’t wish to present. (We have it on good authority that the symposium convenors expect a day of lively discussion and editorial experimentation.)

 

Reanimating Playbooks:

Editing for Performance, Performance for Editing.

Symposium: Friday 10 May 2013, Shakespeare Institute, Stratford-upon-Avon

A one-day symposium to engage in the conversation between performance and text. We wish to provide a space to explore editorial practices on both sides of publication (from preparation to practice) and to explore how we use, compose, and conceptualise critical editions of Renaissance plays. The day will include a plenary panel of editors and theatre practitioners and two practical workshops.

Speakers are invited to submit proposals for 10 minute ‘provocations’ in which a question may be posed, a sticky editorial decision worked through, a long-standing practice interrogated, a new methodology explored, or something else entirely queried, crowd-sourced, considered, contested or created. Suggested topics include but are not limited to:       

-       new solutions to old editorial cruxes

-       problems or triumphs in your own editorial projects

-       experiments with stage directions, punctuation, formatting, annotations

-       desired aims of individual editions, or proposals for a new series style

-       directors/dramaturgs as editors, and vice versa

-       favorite editors of days past

-       the pedagogy of critical editions

We also welcome proposals for 15-20 minute papers or workshops.

A limited number of volunteer actors may be available for workshops; anticipated requests ideally would be included in your proposal.

Please submit 150-word abstracts, along with brief biographical statement to C K Ash at cxa052@bham.ac.uk by Friday 15 March. Accepted proposals will be notified 22 March. Please do not hesitate to e-mail her with any questions about the event.

You can download the pdf here: CFP Reanimating Playbooks

BritGrad:

News and the Shape of Europe, 1500-1750:  Check out this conference at Queen Mary, University of London, in July!

Originally posted on Early Modern News Networks:

News Networks in Early Modern Europe is very pleased to announce an international, interdisciplinary conference, to take place at Queen Mary, University of London in July 2013 on the theme ‘News and the Shape of Europe, 1500-1750′.  The call for papers is available to download below:

For more information about what should be a very exciting event, or to submit a paper proposal, please write to n.j.moxham@qmul.ac.uk; the deadline for paper proposals will be the 28th of February 2013. Please tweet, post the cfp on facebook, and circulate it to wherever you think it will be of interest! We look forward to seeing lots of you at the event.

View original

BritGrad 2013 News!

Hello all,

We’re very pleased indeed to announce that BritGrad 2013 will convene June 6-8. Mark your calendars now!

In other news, we have a new committee about to plan another excellent conference, chaired this year by Cathleen McKague. For more info on the core and sub-committees, head over to the About Us section of the site.

[They can be reached, as always, at britgrad@yahoo.com.]

Société française Shakespeare call for program proposals

SHAKESPEARE 450 : Call for program proposals
21-27 April 2014, Paris

The Société française Shakespeare is organizing in Paris a week-long
conference from 21-27 April 2014 to coincide with the 450th anniversary
of Shakespeare’s birth. The program will include plenary lectures,
roundtables, workshops, seminars, panels, along with performances at
various venues, theatres, concert halls, museums, libraries, artists’
studios and bookshops.

The conference is backed by a large number of French and international
institutions and organizations.

The international organizing committee welcomes seminar, workshop or
panel proposals on all aspects of Shakespeare’s works, their reflections
in painting, sculpture, opera, on radio and screen, as well as issues of
performance, critical theory, poetics, commemorations, textual and
scenic rewritings, translation, biography.

For 2014, panel proposals will welcome up to four papers per session.
Panels may extend for more than one session. Workshop and
seminar/roundtable proposals may include more participants; it is up to
the organizers to determine their precise form (open discussion,
position papers followed by a roundtable discussion, etc.).

Panel, seminar and workshop proposals should include:
- name and university affiliation of proposed leader(s);
- title of panel, seminar or workshop;
- a 500–750 word description stating topic, relevance and approach;
- a 5-line bio of each seminar leader including their email address(es).

Please send your proposals by 10 December 2012 to
cfp@shakespeareanniversary.org.

 

For more information, download the PDF.

CFP: ‘Renaissance Men in the Middle Temple’

I imagine many of you will remember the teaser announcement made at the last BritGrad, and I hope you’ll be interested in the full call. The conference aims to combine research with practice, and the call invites paper and workshop proposals. It looks to be a good one, but you don’t have to settle for my summary when you can read it all here:

[from the conference site]

Renaissance Men in the Middle Temple

1st and 2nd February, 2013

Middle Temple Hall and Birkbeck College, London

Organisers: Darren Royston and Jackie Watson

Confirmed keynote speakers: Professor Jessica Winston (Idaho State University), Dr Sarah Knight (Leicester University) and Dr Lucy Munro (Keele University)

Call for papers

The four Inns of Court were, according to Ben Jonson, ‘the noblest nurseries of humanity’.  All highly influential in terms of their members’ legal, political and artistic roles, the Middle Temple proved a particularly fertile context.  At the end of Elizabeth’s reign especially, the Middle Temple saw many of its members involved in the creation, reception and development of literature and performance.  Most importantly, perhaps, the Inn was a training ground for men who came to transgress and challenge societal norms, and whose future careers were to influence disparate areas of life, before, during and after the Civil War: from Sir John Davies’ work on dance, John Marston’s contribution to drama or Robert Cotton’s influence as an antiquarian to, in later years, the political impact of Henry Ireton or Edward Hyde, Earl of Clarendon.

The early modern Inns of Court have been the subjects of much recent academic work.  Last year’s publications of The Intellectual and Cultural World of the Early Modern Inns of Court, edited by Archer, Goldring and Knight, and a History of the Middle Temple, edited by Richard Havery, as well as the 2010 appearance of the Inns of Court REED volume, edited by Alan Nelson, have significantly added to our understanding of the Inns and their interactions with many aspects of early modern culture.

As new volumes open up areas for future academic research, this conference gives the opportunity for established scholars, early career researchers, and post-graduate students, whose interests centre on this area, to contribute current work which focuses on the role of the Inns more broadly or more particularly on the Middle Temple.  Papers which look at their subject in an inter-disciplinary way will be very welcome.

We plan a combination of academic conference and performance over the two days (involving reconstruction of drama, dance and music) and we invite submissions for a 20-minute paper or a workshop, on an aspect of the Inns of Court between 1580 and 1670.  While topics which draw on the wider Inns are welcome, preference will be given to those which focus on the Middle Temple.  Subjects might include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The work and influence of individual members of the Inns (Middle Templars, as well as those named above, might be Elias Ashmole, John Ford, John Webster, Edward Sharpham, Richard Martin, John Hoskins, Henry Wotton, Thomas Overbury, Benjamin Rudyerd, Charles Best, John Manningham, Bulstrode Whitelocke…)
  • Inns of Court men as playgoers and readers
  • Dramatic work written by Innsmen and/or staged at the Inns
  • Innsmen and performance, including music and dance
  • Revels, humour and satire
  • The Inns’ impact on contemporary politics and in Parliament
  • Legal education and the impact of an Inns training, including aspects of rhetoric and eloquence
  • The Inns of Court and courtiership
  • Aspects of the physical space and location of the Inns
  • Homosociality at the Inns and/or members’ roles in contemporary convivial societies

Please send an abstract (250-300 words) and a brief biographical paragraph (up to 150 words) to Jackie Watson, Birkbeck College, at jwatso05@mail.bbk.ac.uk by Friday 12th October. We would also welcome joint submissions of 2-3 abstracts that could form a panel.

Conference hosted by the London Renaissance Seminar at Middle Temple Hall and Birkbeck College, London

The London Renaissance Seminar meets regularly at Birkbeck College, London, holding seminars, events and conferences.

See www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-research/research_seminars/lrs or contact s.wiseman@bbk.ac.uk.

[Further information from Jackie Watson (jwatso05@mail.bbk.ac.uk) or Darren Royston (droyst01@mail.bbk.ac.uk).

More information on Darren and Nonsuch Dance available at www.darrenroyston.com and www.nonsuchdance.co.uk.]