Post-Conference Wrap Up

Thank you all for attending BritGrad 2016! What an amazing three days full of stimulating conversations, inspiring perspectives, and new connections (and, we hope, friendships). We heard papers on nicknames, philosophy, translation, adaptation, Star Wars, rhetoric and linguistics, Dekker, Jonson, gesture, queer theory, theatre practice, stage design, witches, and a great deal more. The caliber of both the papers presented and the questions asked in each panel were really excellent – we hope you enjoyed them as much as we did!

In case you weren’t able to join us, we’ve made a Storify story with a selection of the live-tweets from the conference. If that’s not enough for you (it wasn’t nearly enough for us) and you want a taste of the whole event, head over to our Twitter page, where you’ll be able to see more on student panels and plenary lectures. You can also find photo albums of each day of the conference (plus the party!) on our Facebook page.

Before you get too involved with tweets and photos, here’s a small sampling of #britgrad2016 by the numbers:

Innumerable tweets posted using the conference hashtag

33 Photos tweeted using the conference hashtag

24 Student panels

18 Photos taken by a BritGrad committee member of attendees enjoying our roving selfie booth

12 Carafes each of coffee and tea (which we think shows admirable restraint)

10 Boxes of macaroons for dessert on Day 1

8 Plenary speakers

4 Travel bursaries awarded by the Lizz Ketterer Trust

2 Video presentations

And your 10 committee members are pleased to announce that they’re almost 100% recovered.

Again, thanks for helping to make the Eighteenth BritGrad conference a smashing success – here’s to #britgrad2017!

Welcome to #britgrad2016!

The week we’ve all been waiting for is finally here, and we are very much looking forward to meeting each and every one of you!

With that in mind, the official British Graduate Shakespeare Conference Committee would like to cordially invite you for an informal welcome drink at our local hostelry, The Dirty Duck. From 6pm on Wednesday 1st June we have reserved a small seated area of the pub, on the right-hand side as you enter. We hope that as many of you as possible can make it!

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The Duck, as it is called by most locals, can be found on Waterside, Stratford-upon-Avon CV37 6BA, just along from the Royal Shakespeare Theatre. It is within walking distance of most accommodation, and hosts a variety of affordable food and drink options to suit most tastes. Not only is it one of our favourite locals, but it’s also the hangout for many an RSC actor – keep your eyes peeled for Hamlet!

Just in case you need a hand getting there, here’s a map:

Hamlet @ The Royal Shakespeare Theatre

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This year we have the pleasure of offering tickets to see Hamlet at the RSC. When booked with registration tickets are the special price of just £16 – we have a very limited number left, so don’t miss out!

Any Shakespeare fan will know Hamlet, but this production brings you the play like you’ve never seen it before. It’s bright, it’s fast, it’s young, and it’s performed by one of the strongest ensembles the RSC has seen in a long time. We won’t ruin it for you, but it’s safe to say we loved it and we hope you will too!

Find out more about Hamlet from the RSC, or watch the feature trailer  here.

Travel Bursary Applications Now Open

Good morning!

We’ve added a new page to the blog this morning, in the drop-down menu below “Funding Resources.” You’ll find information on the four competitive travel bursaries being offered to delegates this year, through the generous support of the Lizz Ketterer Trust, as well as the downloadable application (available both as a PDF and Word document).

Applications are due 19 May and are open to all full- or part-time students who have been selected to present a paper at this year’s conference. Other application requirements and details are listed on the new page. Applications may be submitted by email or post.

In the meantime, remember that early-bird registration for auditors also ends on 19 May. You’re welcome to register after that, however late fees will apply. Submit a registration form today – BritGrad 2016 is shaping up to be a great conference and we’d love to see you there.

~ The BritGrad Committee

Plenary Profile: Eoin Price

It’s time for the final Plenary Profile of the 2016 conference! Meet Eoin Price: an academic (and former BritGrad committee member) who works on the politics of Renaissance performance and publication.

Eoin Price

Dr Eoin Price is a Lecturer in English Literature at Swansea University. Before joining Swansea, he was a PhD student at The Shakespeare Institute where he co-organized BritGrad. His interest in the politics of performance and playbook publication led him to write ‘Public’ and ‘Private’ Playhouses in Renaissance England: The Politics of Publication (Palgrave: 2015) and has also written about Renaissance drama for Literature Compass, The Map of Early Modern London and The Year’s Work in English Studies. In addition to his historical research he is increasingly interested in the twenty-first century reception and afterlife of Renaissance plays. He writes about modern productions on his personal blog and also reviews for Shakespeare, Shakespeare Bulletin, and Reviewing Shakespeare. He is part of the Executive Committee of the Marlowe Society of America and serves as the Performance Editor for The Marlowe Society of America Newsletter.

Plenary Profiles: Stephen Purcell

Ready for the eighth in our series of Plenary Profiles? Meet Stephen Purcell: an academic and artistic director who specialises in Shakespeare in performance.

Stephen Purcell (1)

Stephen Purcell is Associate Professor of English at the University of Warwick. His publications include Popular Shakespeare, the Shakespeare Handbooks volume on Webster’s The White Devil, and Shakespeare and Audience in Practice. His research focuses on Shakespeare and his contemporaries in modern performance and popular culture. He directs for the theatre company The Pantaloons.

Check back soon to find out more about our plenary speakers for BritGrad 2016!

Indian Shakespeares on Screen

Back in November, we posted a CfP for the Indian Shakespeare on Screen conference, which will have events running from 27 – 30 April. Here’s some more information on the conference, as well as their amazing poster.

Poster final

According to the organisers, “‘Indian Shakespeares on Screen’ examines the full influence of Shakespeare in Indian cinema and the way in which Indian cinema has mobilized Shakespeare to raise urgent local and national concerns.” For conference registration or for more information about ticket bookings for the screenings and public interviews, please contact the organisers at: shakespeareandbollywood@gmail.com.

You can find out more about the conference by downloading their conference project description.

 

STR New Researchers’ Network CFP

Looking for another conference to attend (or at which to present) after BritGrad closes this summer? Look no further: the STR New Researchers’ Network is holding their third annual symposium on 6 July. The Call for Papers is below and on their website. The deadline for paper proposals has now been extended to 22 April.

Call for Papers:

Third Annual Symposium:

Innovation in Performance History and Practice

Wednesday 6th July, 10.00am-6.00pm, University of Bristol

The STR New Researchers’ Network (NRN) is pleased to announce their third annual symposium, which will centre on the theme of Innovation in Performance History and Practice. The symposium will also feature a keynote address from Catherine Hindson (University of Bristol).

Innovation is what drives our work as researchers in the academy, and generating original contributions to knowledge is at the core of our development as scholars. As practitioners and performers, too, our work depends upon creativity and originality. For this reason the NRN symposium 2016 is devoted to ‘innovation’ and what it means to the field of performance. Now that the symposium is in its third year – and in the midst of the Decade of Centenaries as well as the marking of Shakespeare 400 – it is more important than ever to reflect on what innovation and change means in relation to theatrical and cultural institutions, or outside of them.

Performance innovates to be popular and relevant to its time, and this year’s symposium is interested in innovation in 21st century performance as well as in the past. The definition of live performance has changed in the last 15 years: innovative live art practices, cinematic presentations of theatrical works, and 3D projections now fall under this umbrella. What is perceived as innovative is also up for debate, with immersive practices, for example, seen either as ‘new’ or as part of a longer history that includes the Happenings in the 1960s. How have innovations shaped the way we think about performance and performance history/historiography today? How is innovative thinking about history important, especially in terms of minority/marginalised groups telling their stories? How can we credibly break with convention when teaching performance history by choosing not to teach the canon of white male practitioners such as Shakespeare and Stanislavski whilst retaining a credible curriculum? What innovative methodologies can we employ when researching performance? Moreover, how has theatre and performance studies as a field overall adapted to change?

With these contexts in mind, we invite proposals that may address, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • Changing definitions of performances and audiences;
  • Challenges to established canons or definitions of performance innovation;
  • The digital age and the future of the performance;
  • The historian or scholar as innovator;
  • Interdisciplinary creativity and industry collaborations;
  • Creative responses to issues such as budget cuts, casualisation, REF/TEF, EBacc, etc;
  • Applications of innovative performance practices in educational, social and community contexts.

The NRN Committee welcomes proposals from new scholars, postgraduates, and early career researchers, on any aspect of the conference theme, broadly interpreted. This year we will be accepting proposals for traditional, 15-minute papers as well as three-paper panels, performed and performative responses, and PechaKucha presentations. Abstracts of up to 300 words should be submitted to nrn@str.org.uk by Tuesday 12th April. Applicants will be contacted by Friday 6th May. Please feel free to contact us at the email address above with queries at any time.

Please note that this symposium will be free for all STR members (you can receive the special discounted membership rate of £10 by attending the Symposium). There will be up to 5 bursaries available for University of Bristol students who volunteer as conference assistants. Email us on nrn@str.org.uk for more details.

This symposium is part of a series of events devoted to innovation run by the New Researchers’ Network this academic year. These include the Teaching Practice event, which encouraged innovation in performance pedagogy, and the V&A Study Day, where Senior Curator Simon Sladen explored how archives might respond to change.

Plenary Profiles: Harry Newman

Here’s the seventh in our series of Plenary Profiles. Meet Harry Newman: an academic specialising in early modern material culture and a former BritGrad Committee member.

Harry Newman

Dr Harry Newman is a Lecturer in Shakespeare and Early Modern Literature at Royal Holloway, University of London. He publishes primarily on material culture, book history and rhetoric in early modern literature, and his first book, Impressive Shakespeare: Identity, Authority and the Imprint in Shakespearean Drama, will be out with Routledge in 2017. He also runs The Paper Stage, a public Renaissance play-reading series with branches in Surrey, Kent and Mantua (Italy).

Check back soon to find out more about our plenary speakers for BritGrad 2016!