Plenary Profiles: Farah Karim-Cooper

And now for yet another fabulous plenary: we are thrilled to announce that Dr Farah Karim-Cooper, Head of Higher Education and Research at Shakespeare’s Globe, will be speaking at this year’s BritGrad.

Dr Karim-Cooper received her MA and PhD at Royal Holloway, University of London, where she taught for several years as a Visiting Lecturer. She designed an MA module for Contemporary Performance at Birkbeck College, and is currently a Visiting Research Fellow at King’s College London. As leader of scholarship and research at Shakespeare’s Globe, she spearheads the Globe and King’s joint Shakespeare Studies MA programme and has developed the Globe’s higher education programme to include doctoral studies.

Karim-Cooper also serves as Chair of the Globe Architecture Research Group. Listen to her discuss some of the work that was done on the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse below (she begins speaking at around 1:40):

(You can watch the rest of the series Building of the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse on Shakespeare’s Globe’s YouTube channel.)

Karim-Cooper has written and edited several books, including Moving Shakespeare Indoors (Cambridge, 2014), Shakespeare’s Theatres and the Effects of Performance (Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2013), Shakespeare’s Globe: A Theatrical Experiment (Cambridge, 2008), and Cosmetics in Shakespearean and Renaissance Drama (Edinburgh, 2006). Her monograph Shakespeare and the Hand will be published later this year.

She advocates a broader view of life in academia, which involves collaborations between universities and the art organisations, accessible scholarship, and participation in the community.

Fun fact: Karim-Cooper cites her favourite Shakespeare play as Titus Andronicus, which she calls “exciting, horrible and deeply moving.”

Plenary Profiles: Laurie Maguire and Felix Budelmann

Oxford professors Laurie Maguire and Felix Budelmann will bring their joint expertise to BritGrad on Saturday, 6 June. Professor Maguire earned her Master’s from the Shakespeare Institute and her doctorate from London University, King’s College. Before teaching at Oxford, she held a post-doctorate position at the University of Toronto and taught at the University of Ottawa. Maguire is interested in Shakespearean interiority, early modern medicine, Elizabethan performance, and the influence of the classics on Renaissance writing. She also hosts a fortnightly seminar on Literature and Medicine.

Maguire has published numerous articles and books, including Othello: Language and Writing (Arden/Bloomsbury, 2014) and Helen of Troy: From Homer to Hollywood (Oxford, 2009). She co-authored Thirty Great Myths About Shakespeare (Oxford, 2013) with Emma Smith, with whom she also wrote “What is a source? Or, how Shakespeare read his Marlowe” (Shakespeare Survey, forthcoming 2015). The essay won the Hoffman Prize for a Distinguished Publication on Christopher Marlowe.

Classics scholar Professor Felix Budelmann received his doctorate from Cambridge and taught at the Open University and the University of Manchester before joining the faculty at Magdalen College, Oxford. He specializes in tragic and lyric Greek literature. Budelmann is also intrigued by cognitive science and its relationship to literature, which led him and Maguire to embark on an interdisciplinary collaboration with evolutionary psychologist Robin Dunbar.

Budelmann recently co-edited Choruses, Ancient and Modern (Oxford, 2013) and co-wrote “Timotheus’ poetics of blending: a cognitive approach to the language of the New Music” in the journal Classical Philology (2014). Check out a video of him discussing the enduring influence of Oedipus Rex:

Maguire and Budelmann will present on audience responses to ambiguity in Othello, The Winter’s Tale, and two Greek tragedies.

Plenary Profiles: Erin Sullivan

We recently saw Dr Erin Sullivan on BBC’s Shakespeare’s Mother: The Secret Life of a Tudor Woman, which is still available to watch on iPlayer.

Sullivan completed her MA at the Shakespeare Institute, where she currently serves as lecturer and fellow, and received her PhD from University College London. Her expertise as a literary scholar and cultural historian includes the history of medicine, particularly psychology and emotion. She contributes to and advises medical-themed journals and arts groups and edits the journal Cultural History.

Always interested in fostering public participation in academia, Sullivan has made advances in integrating media and distance learning into teaching. She also spearheaded ‘A Year of Shakespeare’ in 2012, a project which examined the relationship between Shakespeare and the London Olympics. Yearofshakespeare.com covered more than 80 events across the world, including the World Shakespeare Festival and the Globe to Globe Festival.

Sullivan has written and edited dozens of articles and books, such as A Year of Shakespeare: Re-living the World Shakespeare Festival, edited with BritGrad plenaries Paul Prescott and Paul Edmondson, and Shakespeare on the Global Stage: Performance and Festivity in the Olympic Year (ed. with Prescott, 2015).

Forthcoming works include The Renaissance of Emotion: Understanding Affect in Early Modern Literature and Culture (ed. with Richard Meek, 2015) and Beyond Melancholy: Sadness and Selfhood in Renaissance England, in which Sullivan delves into intertwining issues of identity, religion, medicine, and sadness in contemporary literary writings.

Sullivan has twice appeared on Melvyn Bragg’s program ‘In Our Time.’ Listen to this fascinating discussion on The Tempest here and to her talk about Robert Burton’s The Anatomy of Melancholy here.

Speaker Erin Sullivan on BBC Four

Yet another plenary appeared on television last week. Historian Michael Wood consulted Dr Erin Sullivan, a lecturer and fellow with the Shakespeare Institute, for her expertise on BBC Four’s documentary Shakespeare’s Mother: The Secret Life of a Tudor Woman. The program follows William Shakespeare’s mother Mary Arden through personal and financial loss during an era of religious upheaval and the rise of a new kind of middle class.

The program is available to watch on BBC iPlayer for three more weeks. Go to 32:13 to hear Dr Sullivan discuss how Mary Arden might have dealt with grief after the deaths of her oldest children. Also check out the episode to see shots of the lovely Stratford-upon-Avon, where the BritGrad Conference will be held.

Speaker Chris Laoutaris on The One Show

Last month, we profiled BritGrad plenary Chris Laoutaris, a lecturer and fellow at the Shakespeare Institute. Last week, he appeared on BBC’s The One Show in a segment about Lady Elizabeth Russell, the subject of his book Shakespeare and the Countess: The Battle that Gave Birth to the Globe. Gyles Brandreth interviewed Dr Laoutaris in Playhouse Yard, a location central to the struggle between the “bard and the battle-axe.”

Russell, a strict Puritan, raised a petition against building a theatre in the upscale neighborhood of Blackfriars, London. Early modern NIMBYs who signed the petition included Lord Hunston, William Shakespeare’s patron, and Richard Field, his former publisher and boyhood friend.

Russell succeeded in pushing Shakespeare across the river where he wrote plays for the world-renowned Globe, only to return to Blackfriars after her death. Laoutaris actually suggests Shakespeare’s grudging admiration for his nemesis is evidenced by his creation of the Countess of Rousillon in All’s Well That End’s Well.

Shakespeare and the Countess (Penguin) will be available on paperback on 5 March.


 

This episode aired on 12 February. If still available, Laoutaris’s segment begins at 23:35.

 

Plenary Profiles: Chris Laoutaris

Get to know the fantastic plenaries of BritGrad 2015! Dr Chris Laoutaris, a lecturer and Birmingham Fellow at the Shakespeare Institute, will be featured as the first in a series of brief speaker profiles.

Laoutaris received his undergraduate, master’s, and doctorate from University College London, where he taught and served as Renaissance Literature Course Convenor. He has lectured at Goldsmiths College, University of London, and is currently teaching at the Shakespeare Institute.

He relishes archival adventures and interdisciplinary explorations of early modern literature. His wide range of interests includes poetry (it’s in his blood, having descended from a line of poets), women’s history, translation, and Renaissance studies of anatomy. Other research areas involve early modern superstition and witchcraft, satire, death-ritual, Puritanism, monstrosity, and natural history.

You might have heard of Laoutaris’s book Shakespeare and the Countess: The Battle that Gave Birth to the Globe (Penguin 2014), which has received numerous accolades. The Telegraph and Observer listed it as one of the best books of 2014, and it made the shortlist for the Tony Lothian Prize for Biography. The Countess follows the formidable Elizabeth Russell, a lady who successfully opposed the creation of a Blackfriars playhouse in 1596, forcing William Shakespeare to adapt his writing for the Globe Theatre.

Laoutaris has also written Shakespearean Maternities: Crises of Conception in Early Modern England (Edinburgh University Press 2008) and is now working on the Birmingham Fellowship Project Team Shakespeare: The First Folio and the Men who Created the Shakespeare Legacy.

As expected from someone with such diverse expertise, Dr Laoutaris will speak on the fascinating topic of early modern robotics in Shakespeare and Spencer. Prepare for old-school cyborgs!

Call for Papers: Shakespeare Recreated, New Contexts, New Interpretations

Soon, we will start profiling our fabulous plenary speakers. Until then, check out this upcoming student conference hosted by the Shakespeare International Studies Centre with the Geoffrey Chaucer Student Society and CULTUR(N)ED Student Society:

SHAKESPEARE RECREATED: NEW CONTEXTS, NEW INTERPRETATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF ŁÓDŹ, 22-23 APRIL 2015

Although the Bard appears to be the most researched author in the world, his works and his own person still inspire, puzzle and encourage heated debates. Our conference marks a special three-year period in the history of the appreciation of Shakespeare, with the 450th anniversary of his birth in 2014 and the 400th anniversary of his death in 2016. We would like to invite proposals for 20 minute presentations (followed up by approximately 10 minutes of discussion) in all areas of studies connected with the works of William Shakespeare. Suggested topics include but are not restricted to:

  • Shakespeare and popculture: comics, computer games, youtube, parodies, etc.;
  • Filming Shakespeare: Shakespeare on film and television, adaptations and appropriations,
    representations of the playwright on screen;
  • Performing Shakespeare: staging Shakespeare then and now;
  • Polish explorations of Shakespeare: Shakespeare’s presence in Polish literature, film,
    theatre and art;
  • Representations of (and inspirations by) Shakespeare’s works in world literature, film,
    theatre and art;
  • Reviving Shakespeare: methods of popularizing Shakespeare in Britain and other countries;
  • Movements and disruptions within the Shakespearean canon: why some of his works are
    more popular in certain moments in history or even gain a lasting popularity, while others
    are neglected?
  • Elizabethan culture—society, economy, fashion—and the works of Shakespeare;
  • Apocryphal Shakespeare: plays attributed to Shakespeare, collaborative works and lost
    plays;
  • Intertextual Shakespeare: Shakespearean references in modern works;
  • Shakespeare in the light of modern theories: Ecocriticism, Poststructuralism, Postcolonialism, New Historicism, Gender & Queer Theory, etc.

The conference will be held at the Faculty of International and Political Studies, University of Łódź, on 22-23 April 2015.

The following distinguished guests have confirmed their participation:

– prof. Virginia Mason Vaughan (University in Worcester, Massachusetts);
– prof. Alden T. Vaughan (University in Worcester, Massachusetts);
– dr Dmytro Drozdovsky (National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine).

We invite all undergraduate, graduate and doctoral students to participate. The conference will be held both in English and Polish. Abstracts of ca. 250 words should be submitted to shakespeare.recreated@gmail.com no later than 29 March 2015. Selected papers will be published. The registration fee is 30 PLN (10 EURO for overseas participants), which covers coffee breaks, conference materials and publication.

For more information, please contact the secretaries of the conference at shakespeare.recreated@gmail.com. To find out more about us, please visit the official conference website (http://shakespearerecreated.tumblr.com/) and the website of Shakespeare International Studies Centre (http://shakespearecentre.uni.lodz.pl).

Download this call for papers here.

Call for Papers: Heroes and Heroines

Do you consider yourself a hero? Well, it doesn’t matter as long as you can write about them. Shakespeare Jahrbuch, the Yearbook of the German Shakespeare Society, is calling for papers on Heroes and Heroines. Send them your work by March 31.

The 2016 volume of Shakespeare Jahrbuch will be a special issue devoted to “Heroes and Heroines”.
The editorial board of Shakespeare Jahrbuch invites essays on the following topics:

  • Shakespeare as a cultural/national hero
  • Heroes and heroines in Shakespeare’s plays
  • Heroism in Shakespeare’s plays
  • Shakespearean anti-heroes
  • Tragic and comic heroes/heroines
  • Heroism and genre
  • Shakespeare and the heroes of early modern England
  • Shakespeare and (early modern, Romantic, Victorian, modern …) hero-worship
  • Actors and actresses as heroes/heroines
  • Heroes /heroines in Shakespeare adaptations

Papers to be published in the Shakespeare Jahrbuch should be formatted according to our style sheet.
Please send your manuscripts (of not more than 6,000 words) to the editor of the Shakespeare Jahrbuch, Prof. Dr. Sabine Schülting (email: sabine.schuelting(at)fu-berlin.de), by 31 March 2015.

(Link to call for papers.)

Call for Papers: Over His Dead Body

Bring out your dead! On March 27, the University of York will celebrate Richard III’s reinternment with a workshop on… corpses. Submit your proposals for Over His Dead Body by January 5:

The legal battle between Leicester and York over the remains of Richard III
came to an end in May 2014 with a High Court ruling that the last
Plantagenet king is to be buried in Leicester Cathedral. This hard-fought,
sometimes acrimonious, dispute over bones found in a municipal car park
presented a fascinating spectacle; a modern, even postmodern, restaging of
the medieval myth of the king’s two bodies. The King is dead; long live
the King.

In this research workshop, York and Leicester put their differences aside –
or rather, bring them together in memory and celebration of the historical
figure who inspired one of Shakespeare’s most popular incarnations. To mark
the occasion of Richard’s reinterment on March 26, 2015, the Department of
English and Related Literature at York and the School of Modern Languages
at Leicester invite proposals for a research workshop that will explore the
significance of the Shakespearian dead body on page, stage and screen.
Participants will be invited to join the audience at a memorial lecture in
York Minster on March 26, followed by the research workshop at Kings Manor
– a seat of Tudor government in northern England – on Friday March 27.

Perhaps even more so than the ghost, the Shakespearian dead body raises
fundamental questions about space, place, and belonging and about the
powers that shape its medial and intermedial exhumations and reinterments.
We invite proposals for 15-minute presentations offering textual readings of
Shakespearian bodies, including but not only Richard, either in the
Shakespearian text, or in modern or contemporary production and
performance. Topics might include the following:

· ‘The body is with the king, but the king is not with the body’:
where do we find, or look for, the Shakespearian dead body?
·‘Look on her. Look, her lips’: the Shakespearian dead body as
‘sight’ or image; its embodiment in or by performance, and/or in other
cultures.
·‘O gentlemen, see, see! Dead Henry’s wounds Ope their congealed
mouths and bleed afresh!’ What is at stake in the physical confrontation
of the dead with the living?
· What does the Shakespearian dead body lose, or gain, in translation or
remediation?
·How have particular productions or performances used the Shakespearian
dead body to ask questions about the ‘world’ outside the play?
·What motivates contemporary artists, directors, translators and academics
to contribute to these re-incarnations?
·How is the Shakespearian dead body given value in non-cultural
institutions (the State, science, the press)?

Inter- or multi-disciplinary perspectives are welcome. Proposals featuring
abstracts of up to 250 words in English and a short biographical
description should be sent in word format (doc. or .docx) to both
organizers by January 5 2015.
Please put ‘Over His Dead Body proposal’ in the subject line of your
e-mail.

Nicole Fayard, University of Leicester: nicole.fayard@le.ac.uk
Erica Sheen, University of York: erica.sheen@york.ac.uk

Location: King’s Manor, University of York

(Link to call for papers.)

Upcoming Conferences: Shakespeare & Friendship

Greetings! While you’re eagerly awaiting BritGrad 2015, we will periodically alert you to relevant conferences and calls for papers. Let’s begin with The Halved Heart: Shakespeare & Friendship (with the looming submissions deadline of December 12):

For men and women in Shakespeare’s England, friendship was a relation that
spanned the exquisite virtue of amicitia perfecta and the everyday exchanges
of neighbourliness and commerce. A friend might be ‘another self’, but it was
essential to be wary of false friends or flatterers. The complex nature of early
modern friendship was a rich source of inspiration for early modern dramatists.

Globe Education at Shakespeare’s Globe is pleased to announce our spring
conference, The Halved Heart: Shakespeare and Friendship (Friday 17
– Sunday 19 April 2015), and we invite proposals for papers and panels.
Speakers may address the Renaissance fascination with the ethical demands
of idealised friendship, or the pragmatic reality of instrumental alliances,
as explored on stage. Papers might consider the theatre as a site of social
promiscuity, where spectators could be instructed in the arts (and hazards) of
friendship even as such relationships were enacted in the auditorium. Or they
might examine the overlap between friendship and eroticism, and the points of
conflict between friendship and other forms of social alliance such as marriage,
or the relationship between monarch and subject.

The conference will conclude on Sunday 19 April with a staged reading by a
company of Globe actors of The Faithful Friends (Anon., King’s Men, c.1614).

Proposals of no more than 300 words for papers (or panels of up to three
papers) may be submitted to Dr Will Tosh on will.t@shakespearesglobe.com.
The deadline for submissions is Friday 12 December 2014.

The conference is for scholars and students but is open to all members of the
public who are interested in debates about early modern theatre and friendship.

(Linke to call for papers.)

When bookings open, visit the Globe’s website to purchase tickets. Who doesn’t want to learn about friendship? Just don’t go down the dark route taken by Valentine and Proteus in The Two Gentlemen of Verona.